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How Can We Pay for a Healthy Population? Innovative New Ways to Redirect Funds to Community Prevention

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How can we start paying for things that make people healthier, instead of just treating them when they get sick? The Affordable Care Act has helped catalyze an explosion of ideas about how to expand access to healthcare and control costs. We know that community prevention -- changing the social and physical environments of communities to keep people healthy in the first place -- can go a long way in doing that. In this report, we identify new cutting-edge ways to pay for these efforts.

Prevention Institute researchers talked to health-system innovators around the country to identify emerging new approaches. The result is How Can We Pay for a Healthy Population? Innovative New Ways to Redirect Funds to Community Prevention. The pioneers we profile in this report have found surprising new ways to capture funds already in the healthcare system and redirect them to pay for population health measures that prioritize community prevention.

On March 6th, 2013, Prevention Institute hosted a webinar entitled "How Can We Pay for a Healthy Population?" with four presenters describing promising approaches for generating sustainable and consistent funding for community prevention:

 

  • Janine Janosky, Head of the Center for Community Health Improvement, Austen BioInnovations, presented on the Accountable Care Community model
  • Rick Brush, CEO and Founder, Collective Health, presented on Health Impact Bonds
  • Kevin Barnett, Senior Investigator, Public Health Institute, presented on non-profit hospital community benefit funding
  • Maddie Ribble, Director of Policy and Communications, Massachusetts Public Health Association, presented on the Massachusetts Prevention and Wellness Trust.
We received so many thought provoking, valuable questions from participants that we decided to synthesize them into four overarching questions, and then posed to the webinar presenters. Dowload the second document to read their responses.

 

 

Associated File(s) (click to download):

 

Prevention is Primary

PreventionisPrimary2

Read Chapter One here

Book cover photo credit G.Meyer(c)2006