Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Alleghany, Ashe, and Watauga counties, North Carolina

Local North Carolina-grown fruits and vegetables will be more available, especially to rural communities and low-income residents through new farmers' markets. Teenagers picking up a quick afterschool snack will find healthy items at the convenience store. Children will participate in child-care programs with more physical activity. Mothers will be encouraged and provided the support necessary to breast-feed. Residents will take advantage of new shared-use agreements to exercise at facilities throughout the community. Community members from all three Appalachian Counties will unite in the...

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Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Wood County, Wisconsin

  • In Wood County, 19 new gardens have been created at childcare centers serving 1,800 children. The gardens support early learning about healthy eating and increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables.
  • More than 200 second- through fourth-grade students at 10 Wood County elementary schools participated in Fit-tastic, an eight-week afterschool program that helped them develop healthier eating and physical-activity habits.
  • Two local United Way organizations are incorporating wellness-outcomes objectives into their grant contracts with 58 community-based
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Communities United for Health: Louisville, KY

The Communities United for Health coalition formed to create a "healthy zone" in the Shawnee neighborhood by limiting alcohol and tobacco promotional signage, increase adequate lighting, and decrease graffiti to positively influence perceptions of safety.

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It Starts Here Campaign: Safe Routes For All: Multnomah County, Oregon

How communities are designed and function can promote -- or restrict -- physical activity and access to healthy, affordable food options for children and adults. Part of the Healthy, Active Multnomah County "It Starts Here" initiative aims to encourage the community opportunities for kids to be active before, during and after school.

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Reducing Toxic Pollution in West Oakland, CA

For two years, West Oakland residents and community partners worked to research and identify seventeen indicators to monitor environmental, health, and social conditions for their neighborhood. Residents then used the data in the indicators report to issue a formal request that the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) develop stronger regulations requiring the Red Star Yeast factory (the area's second leading source of toxic emissions) to reduce both pollution and noxious odors. The evidence in the report was also used to build media advocacy, testify at public hearings, and to garner letters demanding regulation and enforcement from the Department of Public Health and local elected officials. The combination of evidence and pressure led BAAQMD to remove the exemptions that had grandfathered Red Star Yeast into antiquated emissions standards.

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